Reading

The 2016 Carnegie Shadowing Experience

There is never enough time to do everything you plan to do. I knew that I would struggle to persuade students to join the new Shadowing Group, everyone is so busy and pressure is on the students to finish assignments, portfolios, exams etc. I received the Carnegie publicity material, bought a set of the shortlisted books and proceeded to put up my Carnegie display in the centre of the library.

The Head of English told me that she had three girls interested in joining the Group, oh well I thought to myself we’ll just go with three, after all they say that it is the quality not the quantity that is important. As the day progressed I noticed a girl hovering around the display, I asked her if she would give some thought to joining our Group. Then at lunchtime a couple of boys came in, again drawn to the display, so I asked them and they said that they would come to the meeting to find out what it was all about. They spoke to two other friends and before I realised what had happened I had eight students in my little Group, four boys and four girls, perfect!

They worked so hard and really contributed to the meetings, the teachers supported us by allowing the students to attend the meetings. Two of the Group entered the ‘Journey’ writing competition, sadly they never won,books were read and the Shadowing Magazine was completed. I am so proud of their commitment to the Shadowing process and the Shadowing Magazinemagazine_preview 2 turned out so well!

Cathy MacIntyre

Learning Resource Centre Manager

Taylor High School

Categories: Book Awards, Magazines, Reading, School Librarians, Stuff and things | Leave a comment

World Book Day at St Aidan’s

Report from Marie McGough

The children’s author, Gillian Philip, visited St Aidan’s High recently as part of the school’s World Book Day celebrations. Gillian Philip’s book, Mysteries of Ravenstorm Island: The Lost Children, was one of the shortlisted titles at the recent Scottish Children’s Book Awards. An eager audience of 60 S1 pupils gathered, in the school library, to listen to Gillian talk of her enthusiasm for books, stories and writing. The main body of the presentation focused on myths, legends, and fairytales, and how we use them to tell modern stories from Dr Who to The Hunger Games. The presentation sparked a lively question and answer session much to Gillian’s delight.

Gillian Philip 022_40

A number of the author’s books were available to purchase and Gillian signed these while chatting with pupils. The S1 pupils thoroughly enjoyed Gillian Philip’s visit and a good time was had by all!

This author visit was partly funded by The Scottish Book Trust and organized by the school librarian, Miss McGough.

Categories: Author visits, Authors, Book Awards, Books, Reading | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Autumn and winter at the S1/S2 Book Club.

Autumn and winter at the S1/S2 Book Club.

The S1/S2 Book Club has been running for a few months now but in order to keep pupils returning you need to keep the momentum, no easy feat! I thought I would tell others about my experience so far.

Poetry, Halloween and Non-fiction books

Week 8 was all about poetry and Halloween. This year the group focused on a poem, I came across for National Poetry Day called ‘Grampa’s Soup’ by Jackie Kay.  The theme was perfect for a lunchtime group – soup!  The poem was read aloud by various members of the group and pupils had to use a computer to find out what type of soup ‘Grampa’ had made using the list of ingredients given in the poem.  The group quickly found it was about Scotch broth, giving our pupils the chance to read something modern and Scottish.  Hopefully, they learned some new Scots words and learned about the ingredients in this traditional Scottish soup.  The poem was short and gave the group time to plan their Halloween costumes using a various non-fiction books (many belonged to our local public library).

Great fun was had by all and there was a wonderful atmosphere in the library as the group busied and immersed themselves in everything Halloween.

The Scottish Book Trust Awards

The last few weeks the members of this groups have been looking at the books shortlisted for the Scottish Book Trust Awards.  During week 11 we examined the Bookstart category.  Pupils got a chance to discuss their favourite storyline, illustrations and front covers, as a group and chose their favourite books in this category and reading these aloud.

Books included;

Wanted! Ralphy Rabbit, the Book Burglar’ by Emily MacKenzie

Mouse’s First Night at Moonlight School’ by Simon Puttock

Never Tickle a Tiger’ by Pamela Butchart

The following week pupils got a chance to explore the books chosen in the 8 – 12 category. We particularly focused on ‘Ravenstorm Island’ by Gillian Philip.  This was the book that the majority of the group wanted to read and each group member read a page aloud.

Shadowing the Scottish Book Trust Awards was something I had ever tried with any of my lunchtime groups.

From this experience I find that shadowing all the books from the awards difficult with a lunchtime group, keeping their interest and ensuring that pupils return every week can be difficult with a lunchtime club. I think in future, I will still focus on the picture book category rather than the whole of the award. All that is left to do now is vote!

Plays

The last few weeks have been all about exploring a new type of genre, new to many and one I had forgotten about. We read and rehearsed the first scene from the play ‘Divided City’ by Theresa Breslin.

A wonderful colleague in the English Department kindly gave up some of her lunchtimes to help guide both myself and the group through this.

Firstly, she got the group to play ‘Murder’, as an opening game to get everyone talking and allowed our pupils to become very animated. This game involves someone being the murderer, the detective and the rest of the group being potential victims.  It all sounds very grim but the activity had quite the opposite effect.  Group members were all buzzing and enthused about this activity.

Once the group had warmed up their acting voices, we focused on recreating the opening scenes from ‘Divided City’.

The week before Christmas was all about recording! This added an extra dimension to ‘Divided City’.   Two of our S5 pupils helped record and direct this production. Great fun and hilarity was had by all, even people outside the group wanted to take part. This really gave the group the acting bug and kept everyone coming back.  What a difference having your colleague and some of our senior pupils involved.

Watch out for more information on our Book Club activities in the New Year.

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Maths Puzzle for Scottish Book Week

 

This year for Scottish Book 2015 Week the library at Taylor High celebrated the week by running a maths puzzle with some of our S1 pupils.  The puzzle was inspired by ‘The Young James Bond Series’, particularly ‘Shoot to Kill’ by Steve Cole and the idea was taken from ‘Brain-Busting Puzzles Series’ by Sarah Khan.

Pupils were put into groups of five and we discussed as a group why James Bond had inspired something Scottish. This got us all talking about the film franchise and why this series might have been chosen.  Only one pupil was able answer what the connection was.  Of course, it was the fact that his father was Scottish and therefore that was our Scottish connection.

An S6 pupil kindly volunteered to read a chapter from the book, giving some of our S1 a chance to explore a book that they might not ordinarily read. It was great to have one of their peers reading aloud and helped set the scene.

The S6 pupils stated “I enjoyed the activity and it was great to read to younger pupils and share a book that they may not have thought about reading before. However, you need to be brave, it can be quite daunting reading aloud to a class.”

Pupils were asked to pretend they were a Secret Agent trying to find a pattern of numbers and letters that would tell them what city in the world their mission would be in. Pupils were asked to find a pattern of six numbers that appeared three times.  For some pupils, looking for six numbers proved rather challenging and so, pupils were asked to find just two of the numbers.  It was amazing, as soon as, pupils had to look for only two numbers the quicker they found the code for six.

Once pupils found the pattern of numbers, they then had to find the letters that were attached to the numbers to discover the city. The letters were all jumbled but pupils were given a sheet that had a mix of possible cities across the world and soon discovered the answer was Berlin.

The next part of the task involved using their geographic skills, as pupils were that asked to name the country that the city was in and about their flags. (For me, the real challenging area of the activity was naming the flag colours!)

To round the activity off, each table was asked to name their group, which included ‘The Book Lovers’ and ‘The Big Ones’.

This really was a great cross-curricular activity, as it involved numeracy, reading, language and geography skills. It gave pupils an opportunity to explore literature and the world of maths further.   It also promotes the values of Curriculum for Excellence, particularly confident individuals and successful learners.

Well done to all the S1s who took part and my maths colleagues who took the time to be involved. It really was great fun and pupils work is now being displayed.

Categories: Curriculum for Excellence, Events, Interdisciplinary Learning, Literacy, Mathematics, Numeracy, Reading, Stuff and things | Tags: , | Leave a comment

Don’t crush reading motivation

Don’t Crush Reading Motivation by Barbara Wheatley, Education Week, October 6, 2015

Categories: Journal articles, PRD / CPD, Reading | Tags: | Leave a comment

Summer School Workshop in the Library

August in the library means Summer School. A library workshop has become a regular feature of this fabulous programme of activities for some of our new S1s.

Great! This was an excellent chance to work with my job sharing partner, something that is rare because we have no cross over days. It would also mean we actually got the opportunity to speak and work with one another, instead of working via email, phone or notes left in the librarian’s notebook. A welcome change for both of us.

I had previously ran craft activities as part of summer school but this was the first year I had thought about designing a quiz, a book character quiz. It was something fun my job sharing partner and I could work on together.

Pupils were split into groups of five and asked to choose a name for their team but pupils were understandably nervous. That’s when Cathy came up with the idea of pupils in the group each suggesting a word and that word would form part of the team name. (Obviously, it had to be something pleasant but that is never really an issue with our pupils!) This caused much hilarity and chat.

It was a great group of pupils with lots of conversations about reading, summer holidays and looking forward to starting high school. We discussed memorable books from primary school, reading out loud and comic books.

Quiz team names included, The Yoda Book Club, Quiz Destroyers (pencils on fire), Dogs Play Football and Haribo Scooby Doo Club. Some of our S6 pupils were on hand to help pupils answer a few of the questions, take videos and pictures of the activity.

To finish the group were asked to create a monster that lives in the library for our walls. Creations were colourful and fun was had by all, even our S6s! This was a great way to get everyone talking and making our future pupils feel at ease about starting a new school and joining our wonderful school community.

Ian MacFarlane, Home Partnership Officer who organised Summer School commented;

“As part of my Summer School at Taylor High School, both Librarians in our Library Resource Centre organised a workshop for 2 groups of 10 P7 pupils making the transition to Taylor High School.   The Library Quiz Workshop provided the pupils with an opportunity to work cooperatively in teams whilst giving them a sense of what the Library Resource Centre can offer them when they begin Secondary School.

The feedback from the pupils was very positive in relation to the workshop itself and the delivery methods of the Librarians. I personally would like to thank Anna and Cathy for their hard work in putting on such a successful aspect of the Summer Programme.”

I hope the quiz is something we can develop in future and many thanks to Ian McFarlane, Home Partnership Officer for allowing the library to be part if this wonderful programme.

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Reading Boot Camp 2015

At the beginning of the summer holidays, a group of North Lanarkshire School Librarians met for Reading Boot Camp, an opportunity to discuss pupils’ reading for enjoyment. This grew out of a discussion on our local forum about pupils selecting books that they recognised from television or film, having the stamina to read far enough into a book to care about what happened, and the assumption that all pupils knew how story works.

To get started, each person described their current work with fiction, detailing the year groups involved, how often they were involved, ideas that worked and issues that arose. Given all schools are different in pupil numbers, layout and staffing, naturally their respective Libraries will reflect those differences e.g. weekly or even fortnightly access to the Library is often impossible in larger schools.

These short introductions acted as jumping off points for wider discussions including:

  • the Librarian’s role in supporting the mechanics of learning to read;
  • Paired Reading: run by different groups in different schools (or not at all) including Support for Learning, Partnership Officers and Buddying schemes, with or without Librarian input;
  • splitting Library time between Information Literacy and Reading for Pleasure?
  • how to make reading ‘normal’ for more pupils?
  • supporting the number of readers that don’t tend to use the Library but buy their own books;
  • supporting the number of pupils who don’t know how to choose a book;
  • identifying the basics of stories – fairy tales, nursery rhymes, picture books etc;
  • helping pupils become more familiar with a wider range of writers, characters and stories – so many pupils only know stories made into films;
  • the role of audio books, and their respective issues with format, copyright etc;
  • trying something new vs re-reading old favourites;
  • making reading visible:  talking to pupils about own reading, encouraging staff to read along with class, Drop Everything and Read sessions (D.E.A.R.);
  • the value of reading aloud – could all lessons be introduced with a relevant reading?
  • the value of oral stortelling;
  • the value of ‘reading periods’;
  • dealing with the eternal shelf wanderers who will not settle with any book;
  • silence or quiet discussion with friends?
  • pupil concentration levels: books versus games;
  • encouraging pupils to think of themselves as readers;
  • whether books fit in a culture of instant gratification;
  • value of colour coding, genre layout, changes in stock layout?
  • the implicit criticism in what pupils ‘should be reading’ and what they’re comfortable with/capable of;
  • ‘laziness’ of capable readers;
  • value of competitive edge?
  • ideas from recent training days and articles.

It was clear that there are plenty of great initiatives taking place already, all deserving of a wider audience (and hopefully some will appear here soon!)

The first Reading Boot Camp sparked lots of ideas, provided a great deal to consider, and left all of the participants enthused and looking forward to the next meeting.

Categories: Books, Curriculum for Excellence, Literacy, Reading, Resources | Tags: | Leave a comment

Yay YA+

Yay! YA+ Book Festival

On Friday 24th April nearly 200 pupils from local secondary school were all waiting with anticipation for the start of the first Yay! YA+ book festival – celebrating all that is brilliant about Teen Fiction in Scotland. Chryston High were lucky enough to take 10 pupils on the day and they were all looking forward to a great day meeting and listening to authors, buying books and enjoying exploring Cumbernauld Theatre.

So first off was an introduction from Kirkland Ciccone, he welcomed all the pupils then let them know what was in store for them throughout the day.

Kirkland Ciccone

Chryston High pupils were in the first group to go around Cumbernauld Theatre and meet a whole host of Scottish authors, getting to spend 10 minutes with each author listening to them talk about their books and their love for teen fiction then having the opportunity to ask questions.

First we met Linda Strachan and heard about her new book ‘Don’t Judge Me’ and her previous books, including Catalyst award winning book ‘Spider’. My usually shy pupils were brilliant at asking her lots of questions, so much so that we actually went over our time a little bit as they were so engaged.Linda Strachan

Next up for us was Alex Nye who spoke about her books ‘Chill’ and ‘Shiver’ The pupils loved her talk and have been borrowing her books since we got back to school that day.

We then met Matt Carney who really impressed the pupils with his tales of adventure, so much so that they are all trying to decide what adventures they want to go on when they leave school.

Matt Carney

Lari Don talking about her new book Mind Blind was a big hit with all the pupils, they all really enjoyed her talk and thought she was so enthusiastic about teen fiction that they couldn’t help but be too.

Lari don

Victoria Campbell kept the pupils entertained by taking about Viking fighting, which features in her book ‘Viking Gold’, and showing replicas of some of the weapons they used.

VC 20150424_111954

Last up on our tour was Roy Gill, talking about his books ‘Daemon Parallel’ and ‘Werewolf Parrallel’. The pupils loved listening to Roy talk about his inspiration for his books and had some really interesting questions to ask.

Roy Gill

After meeting all the authors the pupils had a chance to buy some books from Scotia and find a wee nook to eat some lunch before the second part of the day began.

In the auditorium, the pupils were treated to talks from Cathy MacPhail, Theresa Breslin and Barry Hutchinson. It was then time for some quick questions from the panel of authors before the bus was there to pick us up.

Cathy MacPhail 20150424_131731 20150424_140515

All the pupils had a great day and are already asking when the next one is, making the first Yay! YA+ festival a huge success.

 

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Staff Reading Confessions at Taylor HS

Check out an article on the Scottish Book Trust website about a recent project at Taylor High School for World Book Day. Librarian, Anna Leslie, organised a series of Reading Confessions, with pupils interrogating teachers about their preferences.

http://www.scottishbooktrust.com/blog/teachers-librarians/2015/02/staff-reading-confessions-at-taylor-high-school

The article was also featured on the ‘Save Scottish School Libraries’ Facebook page.

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World Book Day Award

wobod wobodwin

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John Muir and the S1/S2 Book Club

Over the last few weeks the S1/S2 Book Club have been reading all about John Muir. Pupils have been discovering all about the life and times of this environmentalist and creating a wonderful display for the library.

The Book Club have been using the book ‘John Muir: Earth – Planet Universe’ by Julie Bertagna and in particular the teaching resources created for this book. As a group, we examined John Muir’s timeline and his legacy. This raised many questions such as, defining who he was, discovering all about all the places he visited and finding all about the areas of land his trust now own.

The following week, the group took the ‘John Muir Quiz’ to find out if we were like the man himself. Good fun was had by all.

During the final two lunchtimes, one very artistic S2 pupil designed a tree trunk, while other members of the group were on the computers researching. The information they discovered was then placed on the template of a leaf and placed on the tree trunk design.

Thanks to the S1/S2Book Club for making this such a fun and successful activity.

Categories: Books, Clubs / Groups, Creativity, Health and Well-Being, Literacy, Reading | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Roald Dahl Activities and Competitions

We, at Taylor High school library, decided to hold a Roald Dahl Week of activities instead of trying to cram too much into one day. Originally this was to run from Monday 8 to Friday 12 September, the demand for the competitions was so fierce that we had to extend the closing date for another week.

• Competitions galore!! Colourful drawings of cup-cakes on display alongside the ‘dapper’ Willie Wonka figures and our ever popular Roald Dahl Word Search!

• Anna worked tirelessly with a number of staff to create a hilarious power-point presentation listing our ‘revolting recipes’.

• The Book Club and the Around the World were both very well attended and by the end of the week we had produced a very colourful back drop in the library.

• The obligatory prizes were given out and the recipients all went away feeling very pleased with themselves.

Hopefully we can continue to flame the enthusiasm of our library members!

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St Aidan’s High celebrates Roald Dahl Week

With Roald Dahl Day falling on a Saturday this year (13 September), I knew the library would celebrate it in the week leading up to that date. And as it was my first big book event in St Aidan’s, I decided that the whole week would be devoted to Dahl.

As this year is the 50th anniversary of the publication of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, we used that novel for our theme. The week before our events, our newly recruited army of pupil library helpers prepared the library, with the help of some talented S6 pupils, by turning it into Wonka’s chocolate room, complete with a chocolate river flowing through the centre and an Augustus Gloop-filled pipe. By the start of our Roald Dahl Week, the scene was set.

Monday lunchtime introduced pupils to the characters of Charlie… as they were given the opportunity to interview Mr Wonka and an Oompa Loompa (aka a couple of very game teachers!) and find out about their lives in the chocolate factory.

On Tuesday, the chocolate room truly lived up to its name as pupils were invited to make their own sweets from mixed fruit, marshmallows and the contents of a chocolate fountain. Beforehand, pupils enjoyed some time standing about in the playground as, in pure synchronicity, the school fire alarm happened to go off at the same time as I accidentally burned the chocolate in a smoke-billowing microwave. (I will remember that moment should I ever be interviewed for CILIP Update’s “Most embarrassing professional moment”.) Back inside, and with fresh chocolate, pupils were also able to sample some teacakes gifted to us from Tunnock’s as well as goodies provided by our pupil Fair Trade group. And all this to the accompaniment of my dulcet tones reading aloud Augustus Gloop’s story – a warning about chocolate-gluttony if ever there was one.

SAM_0946SAM_0955

Wednesday was a much more peaceful affair, with our writing group creating adverts for their Roald Dahl inspired inventions. Top inventions included the Eye Glass (texting, facetiming and TV watching all available via your lenses when you put your glasses on), Hover Boots for when you’re tired of walking, and the Clobber Cupboard (giving you complete, ready-to-wear outfits). After all that excitement, we needed a relaxing finale, so we ended the week with a Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory film show (accompanied by the left-over teacakes).

The week’s events have seen our lunchtime visits soar, a trend which will hopefully continue over the next few weeks as we launch the Scottish Children’s Book Awards.

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A day at the Festival

Only the second day of term, but OLHS staff and pupils are already out and about in search of literature at the Edinburgh International Book Festival – and we saw other NLC schools too (take a bow, Kilsyth Academy). Fifty 3rd years and five staff headed east, arriving only just in the nick of time, thanks to some lousy traffic.

On the plus side, it meant we didn’t wait about for our first talk with Lari Don, discussing her latest book, Mind Blind, and encouraging the audience to discuss the positives and negatives of having superpowers. This went down well with some of the OLHS crowd who appreciated the interaction, especially when one of our own was invited to share their thoughts, while others wanted to hear more about the book itself.

Staff and pupils wandered off to explore the festival site, check out the fabulous bookshops – enter with your credit card at your own risk – partake of light refreshments, and just enjoy the sunshine. There isn’t a decent bookshop in Motherwell, and a lot of pupils were seen wandering about inside just soaking up everything on offer, and some took advantage of the Festival’s £2 tokens to purchase a wee present for themselves.

Our second talk featured contributors to a new World War I anthology, Tony Bradman, Linda Newbery and Paul Dowswell. Many pupils commented on how much they learned about the war from the discussion between the three authors, while others felt World War I was being talked about too much.

Pupils’ comments afterwards revealed an even split between those who had enjoyed Lari Don, and those who preferred the World War I talk. For some this was a fiction/non-fiction issue, some were more concerned about the presentation, and others the ideas that had been discussed. Meanwhile, the loveliest 3rd years enjoyed both, with many appreciating the differences in the speakers’ styles.

And perhaps best of all, there was a huge amount of interest in who else was speaking and when they could return, which makes all of the work worthwhile 🙂

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John Muir – the graphic novel

On Friday, I was given twenty copies of John Muir, Earth – Planet, Universe via a friendly PT.

According to the John Muir Trust, every secondary school in Scotland should receive the books, but it can also be downloaded as a PDF from the Scottish Booktrust, where there’s also a quiz, teaching notes and information about author, Julie Bertagna, and illustrator, William Goldsmith. There’s even a survey to complete online to discover how alike your class is to John Muir.

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The ‘angst canon’

Is there an ‘angst canon’ of books that teenagers read?

A BBC report discussing the reading choices of older teenagers:

At the age of 17 and 18, readers are often searching for something with a bit of existential angst. And nothing taps into teenage angst quite like the idea of exceptionalism.

It also discusses how reading choices are changed.

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Neil Gaiman: Annual Reading Agency Lecture

Update 15th October: edited version of Neil Gaiman’s lecture is available here.

Neil Gaiman by Chenanceou [Public Domain]

Neil Gaiman by Chenanceou [Public Domain]

See below for a variety of reports on Neil Gaiman‘s lecture to the Reading Agency on 14th October 2013.

Reading Agency: Neil Gaiman delivers our second annual lecture

BBC News: Neil Gaiman: ‘No such thing as a bad book for children’

Independent: Neil Gaiman: Closing libraries ‘is like stopping the vaccination programmes’

Guardian: Neil Gaiman: Let children read the books they love

Bookseller: Gaiman: closing libraries ‘like stopping vaccinations’

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Author Kirkland Ciccone visits Coltness High School

Kirkland Ciccone with pupils from Coltness High School.

Kirkland Ciccone with pupils from Coltness High School.

We had a visit from author Kirkland Ciccone on Friday 13th September to talk to fourth year pupils about his debut young adult novel entitled Conjuring the Infinite. The book is set in a youth offenders’ institute for troubled teenagers.   It’s a cracking read, revealing a world of sorcery, supernatural powers, with a good mystery thrown in. Kirkland was very funny and entertaining but his enthusiasm for books was really plain for all to see. Kirkland also writes and performs in his own one man shows for theatre. He is also in the middle of writing his second young adult novel.

Categories: Advocacy, Author visits, Books, Libraries, Literacy, Reading, Storytelling | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

Bash Street School Library

Bash Street School had its new library opened today by Prince Charles and Camilla in their Scottish guises as the Duke and Duchess of Rothesay.

Good to see another school library opening in Scotland 🙂

Link to BBC story

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D.E.A.R (Drop Everything and Read)

On Thursday 7th March pupils from Chryston High School took part in a D.E.A.R session, organised by Mrs Connor, as part of World Book Day 2013.

DEAR poster

D.E.A.R stands for Drop Everything and Read and the session lasted for the full 20 minutes of tutor time.

Every pupil in the school either brought in their own reading material or read a book supplied from the school library.

The purpose of the event was to promote World Book Day across the school and also to encourage the pupils to read for pleasure.

As a librarian is was amazing to walk the corridors during Tutor Time and see all the classes reading quietly and pupils totally absorbed in the stories they were reading.

D.E.A.R D.E.A.R DSCF1970 DSCF1972

The session has received positive feedback from both pupils and teachers who hope it will become a regular occurrence.

Some feedback from the Tutor Time teachers;

‘Just wanted to say thank you for organising the big read!  It was so nice a relaxed in tutor time and I would love to see it happening on a regular basis!’

‘I really enjoyed it. I think that most of the kids in the class did too – even although many of them were telling me that they never read for pleasure! Only one or two kids chatted quietly. Even the kids who said that they found reading boring sat quietly with their book.
It was really well organised. There was plenty of notice so that I could ask them about what book they’d be bringing in (we had a chat about some of the books we were reading etc) and give them lots of reminders to bring it. Having said that, several kids didn’t have a book with them but managed to pick something from the selection that was delivered from the library. One of the seniors who did this wants to keep reading the book that she borrowed.
I was really shocked at the number of pupils who don’t read for pleasure so I think that it’s definitely worth doing to try to encourage them more.
Thanks very much for organising it.’

I have had lots of pupils come in to borrow the book they were reading from the library which is always a good sign.

As a school we are hoping to have a D.E.A.R session every term then depending on how that goes maybe make it every month. I would love for it to happen every week so that the pupils get the chance to finish a book but one step at a time.

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